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How To Implement The Marketing Mix

Posted by Anonymous on 500 Points
Hi
I would like someone with a really good marketing knowledge to show me how can I implement the marketing mix (4ps) into reality cases in a smart way? Thanks......

  • Posted by MonMark Group on Member
    Not nearly enough information. What exactly are you attempting? Is this for a school project, a marketing plan...?
  • Posted by ilan on Member
    What is the question? for what? for whom? where? why?
  • Posted on Author
    Iam really sorry not to post the case that my question is based on. My question is how do you apply the marketing mix on this type of case. Iam doing this for a school project here is the case and thanks...

    Case Question 1: Ballet
    Live entertainment is a big market in the UK and has the potential to grow even further despite the recent stagnation in audience figures. With over a quarter of UK adults attending plays and almost as many visiting galleries and exhibitions, there is money to made if companies can maintain relationships with customers and widen their appeal.

    The English National Ballet recognises this and marketing efforts look set to increase following the appointment of its first marketing director. The English National Ballet realises it needs to compete not just with competitors such as the stage musical, The Lion King, but also the likes of Playstation and Xbox, and is hoping to improve relationships with its database members and develop new distribution channels to fill more seats as it tours venues throughout the UK.

    Recent research reveals that frequent attendees to all art forms are generally in the AB social class groups and tend to be aged at least 45 years. Amongst the population as a whole, there is a perception that the arts are expensive and elitist.

    Based on various press reports.

    How would you advise the new marketing director to proceed in developing a marketing strategy for English National Ballet?
  • Posted by mgoodman on Member
    And you think your professor wants OUR opinions on this subject? I doubt it. It's more likely he or she wants YOUR views on how to go about this.

    Give us your best thoughts and we'll be glad to critique them and help you present them with more impact. Otherwise, if we do the assignment for you, it kind of defeats the purpose of your assignment, doesn't it?

    Or are you testing us to see if we know how to approach this case?
  • Posted on Author
    Dear Micheal goodman
    One of your colleagues asked me if this was a school project. Iam doing this for my studies, but I haven’t mentioned that it was an assignment. This was a test that I failed because my examiner believed that I didn’t provide enough depth. The answers that were provided by my examiner are skeletal guidelines only, so I need further response and advice. I have recently registered to marketing professor’s site hoping to benefit from the services you provide and to acquire the appropriate knowledge to pursue my education. I don’t intend to use your marketing skills and submit my assignments with your solutions because if I do that, I would be fooling myself. To answer your last question, yes I would really like to test your Marekting skills.
  • Posted on Author
    As I mentioned before, I already have the solution to the problem, and iam not asking you to do any home work or course work for me. I just wanted to see if you have a different approach to this solution. Anyway; I was unaware of the fact that your service has such a policy regarding course work. Next time; I will ask short questions and not cases. Please disregard the case and close it if you can..
  • Posted on Member
    Ashra,

    (In a friendly tone...)

    This is not a service. If you think we are doing this for points, then you are wrong.

    We had alot of people signing up just to ask homework questions. They propsed questions in similiar format as yours - that's why the responses u get is accusing you of doing the same thing. I hope you understand.

    In marketing, there is NO definate answer. What's important is HOW you justify your solutions. Keep this in mind.

    Now back to your request. I understand you want to know WHY you failed in your test. That's the reason why we want to know WHAT did you answer for your test question (which you posted) is because we want to assess how you justified your answer which was marked "not in depth enough".

    Treat your test answer like a movie. Your examiner rated your 'movie' as bad. But without us reviewing the movie, how do you suppose we can help critic your 'movie'?

    We want to help you with your thought process but evaluating your answer. NOT help you by giving you what we think is the right answer. Besides, it's not as if armed with the best answer (that we can come up with) for this question will help you conquer the every marketing questions/problems in the world.

    To be honest, exams questions are typical. It's always testing on how much u understand about concepts and applications - that you can always have a 'template' that you can mimic. I know what you are thinking. You want us to give you something you can break down and mimic. But after so many projects and exams, I find the real value is picking up useful thought process.

    What I mean is, rather than mimicking what "best answers" we can deliver. Show them your answer and observe the different perspectives on how people regard your final solution. Some people are agressive, some conservative, you can learn alot more than focusing on "the right answer". In real life, there's really no right answer. It's about adaptation.

    I may be cynical, but in my university life, I do research on my professors. Why? because they give me the marks at the end of the day. What I think is a good answer does not mean they will think is a good answer. Some professors love charts and numerical answers - I give them more charts and numerical analysis. Some take pride in presentation - I make sure my presenation is the best.

    That's my take away in my univeristy life in generally to share with you.

    If at the end of the day you still want the fish rather than learning how to fish, I respect you decision.

    I know I'm not answering your question at all. I'm just trying to give my perspective on how you should think about participating in this forum. :)

    Sincerely,
    Benny




  • Posted on Author
    I have tackled this case considering many options. First I have initiated a brief analysis of the company’s statues in the product life cycle and assumed it was in the maturity stage. Second: I have noticed that since most customers are from A&B social class, a differentiated defender strategy can be appropriate, since customers are least price sensitive. What iam having problem at is how to conduct a marketing audit in this situation? And how to apply the marking mix to this kind of situation. Greetings.
  • Posted on Accepted
    I think you've touched the topic with many marketing concepts - roles to adopt, PLC evaluation. That's only the "SWOT" part. I'm not sure if you used your analysis and suggested "execution" or "action plans"

    It's a marketing plan for the new director, I'm sure you know what are the important components - SWOT, competitor analysis, objectives, 7 Ps (if applicable), implementation plan, contingencies etc.

    Apart from that, from the case study, I picked out some issues that needed to be address and will elaborate on them because the case seems to highlight on them:

    1) Develope the stagnant market. (Are you going to do it? Or focus on existing market?)

    2) Actions to build relationships with customers. (Loyalty programs? New service offerings?)

    3) Plans to develop new distribution channels to fill more seats.

    4) Segmentation of given general target market -frequent attendees to all art forms are generally in the AB social class groups and tend to be aged at least 45 years. (if you consider your competitors, would you still capture all the AB social class????)

    5) Positioning strategy - there is a perception that the arts are expensive and elitist. (Reposition? or stick to current?)

    I do not know how many marks is allocated for the exam question or how much is expected. If it's not meant to be super comprehensive, I would briefly go through the sections needed for a marketing plan but write abit more about the 5 points i mentioned.

    Here a guide to the parts in a marketing plan:

    http://www.quickmba.com/marketing/plan/

    If you did only presented what you mentioned in the above post, you are only focusing on the general direction of the strategy.

    "I think its a mature market, and this is what normally happens in a mature market, so we should do this and that" You are not wrong. Yes, if we get the many balls into the opponent's goal using an offensive play, we normally will win the soccer match. The question is, which offense play you going to use? 3-2-5? 2-3-5? (WHY?) All of them are offensive. Attack by flank? How exactly are you going to win? (Sorry, I'm not good at soccer.)

    Hope that helps,
    Benny





  • Posted on Author
    Dear benny
    Hear is a selected student's answer for the case. Please advice me of what you think of it greetings......

    The new marketing director needs to first conduct a situational analysis to understand the macro environmental factors, the strengths and weaknesses of ENB, competitor offerings and the market segmentation, target market and positioning of the ballet.
    The ballet realises it is in the business of live entertainment and the marketing opportunity analysis should take this strategic and business view into account, considering the environment, i.e. PESTLE (Political, Economic, Social/Cultural, Technology, Legal, Environmental) with demographic in addition.
    Political
    The political situation is stable in the UK and it could be considered that the government is reasonably supportive of the arts.
    Economic
    There is little information on the wider economic trends at present but we can assume a stable economy, relatively full employment and increasing disposable income amongst the majority of the population.
    Social/Cultural
    The perception that the arts are elitist is running against the more egalitarian view of society now and relaxed dress codes for attendance.
    Technology
    On the one hand technology is developing new multimedia threats, e.g. Xbox and Playstations but there are also opportunities to use new technologies in the presentation of ballet/shows in innovative ways and technology is enabling new ways to promote, sell and interact with consumers, e.g. texting, internet booking, websites.
    Legal
    The legal framework is stable and well developed, e.g. consumers rights.
    Environmental
    There is growing awareness of the environment which may be useful if it can be used to increase consumers’ involvement. Similarly ticketless booking can reduce paper.
    Demographic
    The population is stable with high disposable incomes and is aging. This could give opportunities to attract new audiences that have not previously considered ballet.
    With this overview of the macro environment the director should consider the strengths and weakness, and capabilities of ENB, using a SWOT analysis.
    Strengths
    A well-known ballet company, e.g. brand awareness with a good reputation. The company can be assumed to have the skills and capabilities to develop new shows and present and market them.
    Weaknesses
    The elitist image of the arts in the public mind.
    Threats
    Alternative shows with a more popular image, e.g. The Lion King and other art related events, e.g. exhibitions. Time and money is also going to younger more interactive entertainment, e.g. Xbox.
    Opportunities
    A growth market for live entertainment.
    An analysis of the industry attractiveness and competitive forces is also required. If we consider Porter’s Five Forces:
    Current competitors
    – new multimedia, interactive entertainment and alternative arts events – strong competition. There are also other ballet companies in the UK and from abroad.
    Potential competitors
    – new ballet companies entering the market is unlikely due to the high barriers to entry, i.e. putting the cast together, skills required, etc. However, sporting events, music concerts would be considered current or potential competitors if they are targeting the same consumer segments – medium competitors.
    Power of suppliers
    – the ballet relies a lot on venues to perform in which are suitable and they also depend on a limited pool of dancers/set designers, etc. Medium.
    Power of buyers
    – there are many other alternatives for buyers, so strong.
    Threat of substitutes
    – Strong. As mentioned, sporting events and concerts, etc.
    Overall this is a very competitive industry.
    To establish the market attractiveness the company should do some further market research to establish the size of the market, the current penetration, the target market.
    Currently, a quarter of the adult population attend similar events and frequent attendees to art events are AB social class groups. Further research could reveal further market segments by considering demographic, geographic and behavioural descriptors, e.g. middle class students aged 18-22 years in provincial towns who are not being targeted.
    With a fuller picture of the market segmentation, the target markets to address, the competitive forces and market attractiveness, the new director can develop a positioning or value proposition for ENB for the target markets.
    With this in mind the product, pricing, promotion and distribution issues can be considered.
    Marketing Mix
    Product
    – there could be new plays/ballets written to address contemporary concerns, i.e. a form of new product development or extension. Modern, contemporary ballets could be for one market segment with more well-known themes for another.
    Pricing
    – a price structure could be developed to differentiate between segments.
    Promotion
    – to appeal to new audiences.
    Distribution
    – new venues to perform in, or unexpected venues, internet and email.
    When considering the most appropriate marketing strategy to adopt we can consider ENB to be a differentiated analyser or a differentiated defender. The market is mature with room for some growth. Therefore, the company should adopt a fortress strategy to protect its core business, i.e. current audiences and known ballets, with perhaps a flanker strategy to address the weakness of its current programme, i.e. new ballets with a multimedia element perhaps to attract new audiences.
    Its existing database gives some marketing information to feed into promotion, e.g. direct marketing, emails, etc. Appropriate and timely reporting from this database could provide useful information.
    The company will have to consider its organisation and develop a control system to monitor the implementation of the marketing strategy and feedback.
    Further considerations are whether ballet is best for a niche market. Competing on cost is unlikely but differentiating on quality and service but with price differentials for some segments, e.g. students, would be appropriate.
    In order to address its intention to develop new distribution channels, the company may want to look at a Vertical Marketing System.

  • Posted on Member
    Dear Ashra,

    What you posted is a very methdological way of apporaching the question. All the analysis and PESTLE are written to SUPPORT and define the assumptions that the student have decided.

    Then using all these assumptions, he/she presented the suggestion. A very safe approach and also helps with the flow of logic. Also shows that he/she have put some thoughts on assess the situation that is uncontrollable and adjusted the marketing mix to adapt to the situation.

    What I didn't like is there isn't any thought on positioning - that can be defined on the Ballet's stand in terms of using it's competitive advantage.

    Again, I'm not going to say my answer is correct. But on a general aspect. That is a pretty good methodological approach to derive a marketing plan. :)

    Regards,
    Benny

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