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Topic: Taglines/Names

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I Hate My Business Name

Posted by katemarie1981 on 250 Points
I launched a event business last year and I now hate the name I have chosen. the business is called Perfectly Planned Events. I believe now it sounds too corny and stock standard. I want something unique my niche market is wedding planning. Can anyone offer some suggestions I would prefer strong names nothing with Events in the title. Kind Regards Kate

  • Posted by Jay Hamilton-Roth on Accepted
    Before you give up on your business name, you need to ask prospective customers: What do THEY they of your name? After all, that's what truly matter. Do they understand what you offer? Would your name increase or decrease the likelihood of them contacting you?
  • Posted by mgoodman on Accepted
    You may hate the name, but fortunately your love/hate for the name isn't what's important for a name that will effectively position your business with prospective clients. Why not keep the name and add a tagline that communicates your unique positioning benefit, what makes you special and/or why your primary target audience should consider you?

    FWIW, I think the name is pretty good. It certainly communicates what your target audience should expect from you.
  • Posted by Gary Bloomer on Accepted
    Heed the advice given above. If you MUST change your business name, consider simply stating you name and what you do: Your name: wedding planner
  • Posted by belliott on Accepted
    If your website is operational, I'd install google analytics (if you haven't already) and see what keywords are causing you to show up in the first 10 responses. If your name is performing well in search, and you are getting leads from your website, I agree with adding a tag line and not changing the name.
    And if you are dead set on changing the name and can afford some help, professional naming companies can be amazing. We have used one for two rebranding efforts and they do all the creative, the trademark research, and more for $10k or less.
    Good luck to you!
  • Posted by telemoxie on Accepted
    I disagree with the conventional wisdom on business names. Many people think business names need to be descriptive. I disagree. You cannot predict the type of business you will be doing in six months, let alone 10 years.

    What do the biggest most successful marketing companies think about the importance of descriptive names?

    Let's take a look. Here is a list of large marketing and advertising related companies. Notice how few of them have descriptive names: http://www.adbrands.net/us/top_us_advertising_agencies.htm

    Why don't they use descriptive names? Because descriptive names are a bad idea. They trap you into a particular line of work. They let people say, "we don't need any" before you have a chance to describe your business. They prevent you from pursuing profitable opportunities. They force you to waste your time playing why you don't really do what your business cards say.

    It has been sad to see this form take a wrong turn and focus so much effort on giving people bad advice. Do not choose a descriptive name. Look at the example of successful marketing companies. Otherwise, X. months from now, you will be facing exactly the same situation you are facing right now.
  • Posted by telemoxie on Member
    sorry, I meant to say, you waste your time explaining why you don't really do what your business card say.

    It is okay to have a venture into a particular type of business and to brand that venture with a descriptive tagline. You can create webpages and landing pages and marketing campaigns related to the venture. And you can do it all under a nondescriptive business name.
  • Posted by saul.dobney on Accepted
    Fairytales

    AWED - A Wish Every Day

    Inlove

    I Do

    Daysed / Daysie
  • Posted by ricky.musicroot on Accepted
    Gone are the days when you want a name to clearly indicate your nature of business. Your name need not explain what you do. Your Logo Can. Perfectly Planned Events is very basic. There is no creativity and a different feel to it.
    Choose a name that you LOVE and stick to it. You need not find words matching with the industry but things you believe in. It could be your Superlative Services or your Friendly Approach. So, for example you name is AMIGO with a tagline that says 'Your friendly Event Partner'.

    The name can be anything but you have to believe in it. Also, today there are various ways to advertise without spending like Facebook, Twitter , Blogs etc. So, you need not worry about the name being so specific.

    Choose a name that sounds good, is easy to remember and sticks with people.
  • Posted by mgoodman on Moderator
    telemoxie makes an interesting point, but I would observe that fanciful, or non-descriptive, names that work seem to be mostly found among large companies that spend outrageous amounts of money to communicate the positioning/benefit of their brand(s). They can afford to invest in brand names that require consumer education, as they are generally in the game for the long haul and have the resources to give their strategies time to work (like years, if necessary).

    Smaller companies need to make every dollar (or rupee or euro, etc) work as hard as possible for them right from the start. They need for the name of the company to communicate some benefit or product category or feature that might be important to a prospective customer, so that everyone who learns the company's name also begins to form an image of what the company can do for them, why they should care, or at least what the company does/sells/provides.

    We have consulted with very large companies (Fortune Top 50) and very small companies (e.g., family-owned, local, start-ups, etc.), and a bunch inbetween, so we've seen both sides of this coin close-up. Great "image names" can be really effective if/when you can invest in strong advertising to create awareness and make the connection between the name and the positioning benefit. But when you're on a very limited budget, having a fanciful name is like entering the ring with one hand tied behind your back.
  • Posted by Veslebert on Member
    Opting for a brand new name means new domain, new emails, new stationery and starting again with marketing efforts to promote the "new" brand.

    You may do something inbetween. Instead of completely substituting the name, think the option of slightly changing it. From "Perfectly Planned Events" you can move to
    -PPEvents (not suggested for Spain because of political meanings)
    -PePlevents (... weird)
    -OKEvents
    -YesEvents
    -PPlevents (evocates "people events")

    All these domains are already taken, as the word "event" is way too popular. Try to play this game to see if you find an available version.

    Another option is keeping you present domain and related email accounts, and then create a new brand name.

    Good luck!

    Alberto
    Spain
  • Posted by telemoxie on Member
    do mgoodman and I disagree? Maybe not. I believe his company name is, "dialogue marketing group". this gives important information about his work style and capability. For one thing, he wants to have discussions and stimulate discussion. We know this is true about him because of his actions on this forum. And, he lets you know that he is not alone, that he has a team which can help you. I believe this is an excellent example of a company name. It describes the work style and personality and capabilities of the business and business owner without restricting the type of work he pursues.

    You need to find a similar name. Do not spend money to create a straitjacket for yourself. Try to find some truth about yourself and your work methods (possibly by interviewing previous clients) and express your strengths and point of view and work style without limiting yourself or your company to particular types of projects.
  • Posted by ozdesign on Accepted
    My son is getting married later this year and because the topic is to the fore in our household, I have a been observing the industry up close.

    Personally, I would try and keep some of the elements of your existing name, if only because a group of people are already used to it. To change might completely undo any reputation and goodwill you've built for the business. I'd use it as the tagline and reshape your business name to suit your personality.

    Your Ultimate Wedding – perfectly planned events
    Love And Other Things – perfectly planned events
    Wonderful Weddings – perfectly planned events
    Katy Did It – perfectly planned events
    Name Wedding Planner – when it just has to be perfect
  • Posted by ozdesign on Member
    My son is getting married later this year and because the topic is to the fore in our household, I have been observing the industry up close.

    Personally, I would try and keep some of the elements of your existing name, if only because a group of people are already used to it. To change might completely undo any reputation and goodwill you've built for the business. I'd use it as the tagline and reshape your business name to suit your personality.

    Your Ultimate Wedding – perfectly planned events
    Love And Other Things – perfectly planned events
    Wonderful Weddings – perfectly planned events
    Katy Did It – perfectly planned events
    Name Wedding Planner – when it just has to be perfect
  • Posted by carrie77 on Moderator
    Hi Everyone,

    I am closing this question since there hasn't been any activity in 10 days.

    Thanks for participating!
    Carrie (Moderator)

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