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Make it Short and Sweet

July 23, 2009  

"If you thought saying something useful in 140 characters on Twitter was hard work," says Nick Usborne in an article at MarketingProfs, "good luck with the 95 characters you have available when writing a Google AdWords ad."

So how do you convince someone to click through and visit your landing page without going over your 95-character limit? Usborne has some good advice:

  • Always include a strong keyword or phrase in your title. If people are searching for an office coffee maker, for instance, their eyes will likely scan for the specific phrase "office coffee maker."
  • Avoid long words when a short word will do. "An 'automobile' is a 'car.' A 'giveaway' is a 'gift.' An 'offer' is a 'deal,'" explains Usborne. "Using short words can give you two or three extra words to work with."
  • Be specific. Stand out from the paid and organic crowds with precise descriptions that go beyond basic keywords. The phrase "16-foot ocean kayak," notes Usborne, will attract more relevant attention than the more generic "kayak."

The Po!nt: As sharp as your ad copy gets, the proof—as always—is in the pudding. "Just keep testing and testing and testing until you get ads that grab the attention of the right prospects and then convert best into clicks and sales," he says.

Source: MarketingProfs. Click here for the full article.


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