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You can have the best product in your industry, but if people don't know about it, does it really matter?

Some business owners believe being great as a company is enough for the media to take notice. Although that occasionally happens, most companies gain public traction through smart PR tactics.

Executing a solid PR strategy and creating buzz around your enterprise may sound daunting, but it doesn't have to be. Here are three tried-and-tested ways to get more media placements and name recognition.

1. Home in on what's unique, and craft your pitches around that

By now, you should know what differentiates you from your competitors. If you're not sure, it's useful to go back and reassess the things that set you apart. Then start focusing your messaging on those things.

In every press feature, your spokespeople should convey at least one message relate to what differentiates you. Repeating those messages will help shape public perception of your company.

So, get clear and zoom in on what makes your company unique. It helps to build awareness, and it can also give you fresh ideas.

Once you determine those one-of-a-kind elements about your business, write down different angles to approaching them. Finding new angles can prompt you to see a variety of new publications you could pitch to. So, pitch without delay!

Bonus tip: Stay alert and informed of what's happening in the world. Is your unique offering suddenly more relevant in a specific context? Put out a press release and ramp up your pitching. Newsjacking is still a powerful PR tactic, so don't miss out on ways to piggyback on the current news.

2. Make the most of your in-house talent

It's astonishing how many founders and CEOs miss out on promoting their businesses. Free PR opportunities, there for the taking, sitting untapped…Isn't that a shame?

It is, especially when you consider the number of outlets that are eager to hear your story and use your insights.

But how do you find them? A little research can yield an impressive list.

For starters, go for the easiest ones: interview platforms. It's all they do—their employees interview entrepreneurs about growing their businesses. Use specific keywords to find them and save the ones you could pitch. The great news is that some of them don't even require a pitch. You just have to fill out the interview and submit it.

Also, add to your list:

  • Industry blogs that you could improve by offering short quotes from your in-house experts. For instance, if I read a good article and feel that one of our executives could make it even better, I reach out and offer to help. The company gets mentioned, our website receives a backlink, and we share the piece extensively on our channels. Everybody wins.
  • Websites that aren't in your space but cover topics your C-suite could comment on. If I enjoy a lifestyle publication, I won't hold back from pitching our team on topics such as productivity, working from home, or even health. Your colleagues' insights can be just what that writer is looking for.

Bonus tip: Some writers resist the idea of promoting a company directly but don't mind featuring its CEO or other executives. Take advantage of that approach and help them put a human touch in their stories. However, be selective of such publications. Run every website through a tool such as Ahrefs to learn about its domain rating (DR) and traffic. At ZeroBounce, we focus on websites with a DR of at least 60.

3. Partner to cross-promote

Things get slow sometimes. You might feel that you've exhausted all your stories and your entire list of target publications. However, putting your PR on hold isn't an option.

So, what do you do when nothing's happening? You make things happen.

Think of all the companies you could partner with and reach out to them with cross-promotion ideas. It's an easy way to expose your name to a new audience.

How do you choose those companies? Here are a few jumping-off points:

  • Start with businesses that offer services complementary to yours. For instance, a lead generation platform and an email verification service are a co-marketing match made in heaven. If you run a grammar checker, you could partner with a company that offers an alternative to Microsoft Word. Does your tool already integrate with others? Then building connections should be a breeze.
  • Look at companies right outside your space. Let's say your business offers online yoga classes. Could you approach a health food company with some creative cross-promotion ideas? Reach out to other wellbeing businesses, as well.
  • Keep broadening your circle and consider less obvious options. A travel agency could join PR forces with a footwear company and promote comfortable sneakers to wear on vacation. A workout app could partner with a music streaming service—oh, wait, that's been done. But who says you can't do it, too?

Bonus tip: Over the years, collaborations have generated countless media placements for our company and its partners. Take them seriously, and associate with people who do the same. Using blogs, social media, email, and other channels, promote your partners generously, and you'll both reap the benefits.

Put the audience first: It's always the best PR tactic

When pursuing the PR avenues described, focus on what would most engage the audience of your target publications. Journalists don't work for our companies; they work for their readers. Use that as an anchor for every pitch you send, and you'll get more reactions—and more PR for your business.

More Resources on Getting PR for Your Business

Why Editors Reject Guest-Content Pitches From Brands

A PR Primer for Marketers: Five Steps to Bigger Buzz

Show the PR Love: How to Build Relationships With the Media

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

image of Corina Leslie

Corina Leslie is the PR manager for email validation and deliverability platform ZeroBounce.

LinkedIn: Corina Leslie