People often say that marketing is a mix of science and art. These days you can measure just about every detail of every activity or campaign, but is that enough?

Now is the time to reevaluate what it means to be data-driven in today's increasingly digital and competitive world. For content, event, digital, and product marketers, it needs to be about more than just collecting as much data as possible. Disparate data sets only make it more complicated—having data, a 360-degree view, and an action plan will be a deciding factor in success.

Join us to learn:

  • What marketing KPIs to measure and why
  • Common pitfalls with product marketing metrics
  • How to align sales, sales enablement, and marketing
  • Why implementing competitive intelligence impacts goals
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KEY DETAILS

  • Date: April 30, 2020
  • Length: 45 minutes
  • Presenter: Jordan Weiss
  • Sponsor: Kompyte
  • Element: Analyze, Management
  • Topic: Metrics & Measurement
  • Price: $0

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THIS SPONSORED WEBINAR FEATURES:

Jordan Weiss is VP and head of marketing at Kompyte, with a 20-year proven track record of driving growth for organizations from start-up to Fortune 500. He has extensive leadership in building go-to-market strategy and driving results from top talent.

SPONSORED BY:

Sponsored by Kompyte
Kompyte is a competitive analytics platform that empowers product marketing, growth marketing, and sales enablement. The CI tools keep you hot on the pulse of your competitors by automating the repetitive parts of the research process and compiling all the findings into one, easy-to-analyze place.