The intranet is beginning to restructure the organization in more ways than one.

Content is now an asset, and the people who manage it need to treat it as such. Managing editors, and their teams, understand how technology can facilitate effective publishing, collaboration and self-service focused application development.

Whoever is put in charge must be given real authority.

The inside of organizations can be a political minefield. (The bigger the organization, the bigger the minefield.) Without solid policies and processes, intranets can quickly become chaotic, nonproductive spaces. Everybody wants their links and content on the home page because everybody thinks that their content is so important.

Without someone in charge who can say no, the intranet can become a messy political battleground. Staff don't like that.

Many intranet-based online communities have failed miserably. To begin with, some managers treated such communities and discussion groups in a cynical manner. They looked at them and saw a cheap way to spread knowledge throughout the organization. All you had to do was install some discussion software. The knowledge sharing would just flow and flow.

Of course, it didn't happen that way. There was an early burst of enthusiasm, and then people got on with their real jobs. For every answer given, there were 20 questions asked. Topics went off the point. Then there was the volume poster: the person who had an opinion on absolutely everything and was not afraid to express it.

Sometimes, when things weren't going well, the discussion areas became centers of agitation. A typical statement might read: “As usual, I bet nobody from management will reply to this complaint.” (And, of course, they were right.)

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Gerry McGovern
Gerry McGovern (gerry@gerrymcgovern.com) is a content management consultant and author. His latest book is The Stranger's Long Neck: How to Deliver What Your Customers Really Want Online, which teaches unique techniques for identifying and measuring the performance of customers' top tasks.