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The Seven Pitfalls of a Modern-Day Brand

by Matthew Turner  |  
January 3, 2013
  |  6,856 views

The world is small. Right now I'm talking to you, and you may be thousands of miles away. Yet you can leave a comment and I can reply in minutes.

Reaching people is easy these days. For all intents and purposes, we no longer have technological barriers and geographical boundaries to worry about. Brand awareness is easy to come by.

Or is it?

If you run your own business or you are tasked with improving your company's brand image, you know better than most that the barriers maybe lower and people maybe easier to reach, but life is still tough.

Brand Awareness is hard to come by.


A Modern-Day Issue

Just because you can doesn't mean you will.

We could all become the next Coca-Cola, but most of us won't. In fact, the vast majority of companies will come nowhere near such success. One of the biggest reasons is how companies approach brand awareness.


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Matthew Turner is a strategic marketing consultant and author who helps writers and entrepreneurs create brand stories. Reach him via his website, www.turndogmillionaire.com, email him at matt@turndogmillionaire.com, and follow him on Twitter @turndog_million.

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  • by Leslie Hale Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    "lack of voice" - brand voice is usually the tone and personality. Is what you are talking about here more the message?

  • by Justine Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    This is a fantastic article. Branding, no matter how old the definition and concept is, is still a vital part of a company's overall image.

  • by Samantha Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    Love that brand voice made your #1, by the way. It's pretty much what we blog about every week at http://zao525.com/our-two-cents-worth/

    I tend to agree with the comment from Leslie, that brand voice is more about tone of your message rather than the message itself. When it comes to branding though, it's hard to distinguish the variables. I often refer to brand voice as the brand's "personality," which would include the message as well.

    If you don't have anything good to say, it doesn't matter how you say it. Message comes before voice, but both are essential in building a strong brand.

  • by Heather Poduska Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    Great article Turndog!:) Love the part about relax. My resolution for the New Year is to be more approachable. Sometimes, especially as branders or image specialist, we try so incredibly hard to come across as professional, polished and having our own brand zipped up, the shiny veneer of it all gets in the way of creating natural emotional human connection. Thanks for the reminder!

  • by Matthew Turner Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    Leslie: I suppose I see voice as the personality, which like Samantha says, opens the door for the message. The message is such an important aspect, but how you come across needs to align with everything else, too.

    When I say lack of voice, I mean doesn't pack a punch. It's a mere whisper :)

    Matthew (Turndog Millionaire)

  • by Matthew Turner Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    Justine: couldn't agree more. It's so important, more so going forward I think. We need to develop brands with meaning!

    Matthew (Turndog Millionaire)

  • by Matthew Turner Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    Thanks Sam, appreciate it :)

    Both indeed are vital for a solid build. It helps tell a very particular story, which in the future - at least in my opinion - will make or break many companies. We desire emotional connections, us crazy consumers do

    Matthew (Turndog Millionaire)

  • by Matthew Turner Thu Jan 3, 2013 via web

    Heather: I know what you mean. We get pushed into the squeaky clean image, but to be honest it doesn't matter so much anymore. Smart and clean, sure, but I think a little quirky, unique traits go a long way!

    Plus, it's much more fun to be comfortable :)

    Matthew (Turndog Millionaire)

  • by Linda Killion Fri Jan 4, 2013 via mobile

    Absolutely agree that staying human is essential: taking the "social" out of media and thinking of it as simply another ad opportunity defeats the purpose.

  • by Steve Ulin Fri Jan 4, 2013 via web

    Hi Matthew ... thanks for your insight.
    You mentioned Coca-Cola as a success.
    I've recently been thinking about Coke and how they approach brand awareness.
    Looking at the Sergio Zyman book again prompted it.
    I'm wondering ... have they ever been as successful as when Zyman was CMO all those years ago?
    When everyone thought the market was saturated and nobody believed Coke could sell more, he boosted sales 50% and the stock price responded by quadrupling.
    I'd say that's a fairly good job in avoiding the pitfalls. It might be an idea to interview him and get his take
    on how he might do it all again today.




  • by Serge Sat Jan 5, 2013 via web

    Great article! Thank you

    Absolutely agree with too much 'sell' part. It's only engagement that brings the best result. And the example provided is very appropriate.

  • by Matthew Turner Sun Jan 6, 2013 via web

    Linda: 100% spot on. I think we forget that it's in the name... SOCIAL

    Sell, sure, but it comes down the list of things to do

    Matthew

  • by Matthew Turner Sun Jan 6, 2013 via web

    Steve: that would be an interesting interview. He also made mistakes, so it would be interesting to see what he thought did and and didn't work

    Matthew

  • by Matthew Turner Sun Jan 6, 2013 via web

    Thanks Serge :)

    Matthew

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