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Topic: Advertising/PR

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Promoting Wedding Venue

Posted by Anonymous on 125 Points
Hi everyone, I'm working as banquet sales and now responsible for a 400 pax capacity wedding venue. The venue is quite popular 3 years ago, but with new venues nearby and very little promotion this place are getting forgotten. I already join popular wedding magazine and websites for promotion, I also provide special commission for the wedding planner for their reference but that haven't show any progress. Our package price already competitive compare to other venues and already include catering, decoration, wedding cake, hotels room and entertainment. Maybe you can help me with promotional ways that drive customer to come to our business. Thank you.

  • Posted on Member
    Have you considered a "face lift," a rehab, a redecoration of your facility to keep pace with the newbies on the scene. Often it takes more imagination than money to pull off an invigorating rehab.

    Keep in mind, too, that brides don't always want "cheap." What they want is elegant. So don't count on having the lowest price to bring in the business you seek.

    Phil
  • Posted by Jay Hamilton-Roth on Accepted
    Have you created (series of) video(s) that showcases beautiful events that have been held there? You want to evoke the feeling of, "I want my event/wedding to be just as beautiful as that....".
  • Posted by thecynicalmarketer on Accepted
    You need to look beyond discounts, commissions, and promotions.

    Times and tastes change rapidly, especially in your field, and perhaps your offering is not perfectly aligned with what people who are planning a wedding are looking for.

    Start by bringing the largest, most influential wedding planners to your facility. If you need to, offer them something of substantial value. Then, get them to give you a candid criticism of what you need to update or fix. You need to find people who will be completely honest with you. After you make the adjustments you will attract more business, and the ones who helped you will have a personal interest in your success and will be much more likely to send business in your direction.

    Also, spend more time checking out the offerings of more successful competitors and learn from what they do well.

    Best of Luck, JohnnyB.
    The TCM Blog, http://bit.ly/75KkSG
    http://twitter.com/tcmblog

  • Posted by michael on Accepted
    A lot depends on what you allow in. If you don't allow outside catering, you won't get referrals from caterers.

    Glad to see you're on theknot.com or whitewedding.com etc. These are more defensive moves....unless you have the biggest ad.

    Make sure you've got a facebook/myspace presence..that will help.

    Everyone wants the wedding but they forget that the shower is more relaxed and brings in lots of unmarried women.

    Lastly, build a relationship with the nail salons and day spas.

    Michael
  • Posted on Member
    Do you attend wedding shows?
  • Posted by MonMark Group on Accepted
    The keys may be in your statement:
    a. It has not marketed in a while (no visibility, no business)
    b. It is old. This tells me that there has been no "face lift" as Phil suggested.
    c. They have many, new competitors in the marketplace. Brides (and grooms)...forget that, grooms have no say...

    c. Brides want a hip, nice, beautiful, clean, bright, new place to hold her reception...PERIOD. If your company does not fit that description, then begin with a renovation.

    You can put lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig. If your owners do not wish to invest in marketing/advertising on a consistent basis, or invest in a make-over, you may be spinning your wheels, over there.

    I do not believe you can compete when the playing field is not level. And, with new competitors taking up all the oxygen, there's not much left for you.

    Randall
    White Mountain Marketing
    Houston (The REAL), Texas
  • Posted by MonMark Group on Member
    The keys may be in your statement:
    a. It has not marketed in a while (no visibility, no business)
    b. It is old. This tells me that there has been no "face lift" as Phil suggested.
    c. They have many, new competitors in the marketplace. Brides (and grooms)...forget that, grooms have no say...

    c. Brides want a hip, nice, beautiful, clean, bright, new place to hold her reception...PERIOD. If your company does not fit that description, then begin with a renovation.

    You can put lipstick on a pig, but it's still a pig. If your owners do not wish to invest in marketing/advertising on a consistent basis, or invest in a make-over, you may be spinning your wheels, over there.

    I do not believe you can compete when the playing field is not level. And, with new competitors taking up all the oxygen, there's not much left for you.

    Randall
    White Mountain Marketing
    Houston (The REAL), Texas
  • Posted by MonMark Group on Member
    sorry, I don't know why it posted twice....
  • Posted on Author
    Thank you for quick response, I already got some nice input, but I'd like to wait and maybe there will be couple more new ideas.

    I already manage to join Wedding shows, and analyze competitors. For decorations department, I already worked with famous local decorator so each couple won't have the same decoration in their wedding, but the decorator also work for other venues as well. I'm thinking about giving bonuses on my Wedding package, one of my competitor is giving voucher for furniture, bridal even sweater for the groom. I already tried to include chocolate fountain and hotel's room upgrade, but that doesn't seems to be working, maybe you can give me ideas for what really interesting for couple who wants to get married.
  • Posted by marketbase on Accepted
    Consider researching opinions, testimonials, comments, etc from past customers (what did or didn't they like about your place and why) AND contact recently married couples (culled from local paper, etc) and ask them why they chose the venue they did (especially if it wasn't yours) and more importantly, why they didn't choose your place. Hurts, but sometimes the gain is worth the pain! Finally, see if local town halls which grants marriage license provice a list of venues for your town.

    Best of luck
    jag
    MarketBase

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