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Seven Things Marketers Need to Know About iOS7

by Tobin Dalrymple  |  
July 8, 2013
  |  4,926 views

Apple has unveiled iOS7—the biggest change ever made to, arguably, the world's most popular smartphone and tablet operating system.

The timing of this radical transformation is no accident. Apple is facing increasing competition. Because of the impressive gains from players such as Samsung, the mobile landscape is no longer under Cupertino's control.

Which is why marketers shouldn't see iOS7 as just a fancy new face on an old platform.

Apple is displaying an evolved attack to take on an evolving mobile world. Accordingly, marketers in all fields would benefit from taking a closer look at the new features of iOS7; after all, they need to start planning their own strategies to succeed in the ever-changing and increasingly more important world of mobile.

1. New Safari: The Web Just Got Even More Crucial


Web vs. native is one of the oldest debates in the young world of mobile, and it simply won't go away.

Many marketers face this question, and the choice comes down to distribution, performance, and openness. Each side has pros and cons, and there truly is no one correct answer. But we've known for at least two years that most mobile consumers prefer reading on the Web. It's more natural to open up Safari to see your favorite news source than it is to go to an app.


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Tobin Dalrymple is a former national newspaper journalist turned content marketer at Pressly, a mobile publishing platform that helps marketers drive results with their mobile content. You can get more advice on Pressly's blog.

Twitter: @TobinTobin

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  • by Randy Milanovic Mon Jul 8, 2013 via iphone

    I have to admit... I zeroed in on the Safari section and simply scanned the rest. It is no surprise people prefer reading on the web vs in app. Just take a moment to count the seldom-used Apps on your own iPhone to get what I'm saying.

  • by Christina Tarkoff Mon Jul 8, 2013 via web

    Thanks, you've tempted me to go back to Safari. I 've become a Chromer on iOS, as well as OSX. I'll give it a try!

  • by Chris K. Mon Jul 8, 2013 via iphone

    There are two things I find ironic about this article. One is that despite its point that many people prefer reading via web over reading through a native app, I was prompted to check out Marketing Profs "new" iPhone app upon navigating to this article first via mobile Safari (which I happened to be using through the current beta ios7!). The second piece of irony is that your "new" iPhone app isn't even optimized for iPhone 5 yet and here you are with an article about preparing for ios7 as a marketer? That's funny. And I think its worth noting that most likely, the prevalence of web versus native app reading has more to do with HOW someone discovers content over personal preference. For example, I got to this article first through a link in an email...and links will almost always open in a web browser...and I'd have happily stayed there if it weren't for Marketing Profs well placed bit of code that identified that I was on an iPhone and so prompted me to download their "native" app. Additionally, people very often come to content through social media apps such as Facebook or news/blog curation apps such as Flipboard, who in order to keep you in-app, provide you with an in-app browser. I wonder how those reading experiences get tracked by analytics since those in app browsers likely use the same engine as mobile Safari. Add to that the fact that so many "native" apps are essentially just kiosk type browser skins often built with HTML5 (Facebook's own app was that way for a while), and it's easy to see how data indicating a preference for web over in-app could easily be inadvertently skewed. Just a thought, assuming of course that such statements are based on analytics data rather than poll based.

  • by Mike Spanjar Mon Jul 8, 2013 via web

    Tobin, kudos for pointing out the importance for marketers to understand the inner workings of the mobile OS. Only then can we truly take advantage of the possibilities. I would argue two of your points, though. FIrst, I believe the larger picture is to understand the commonalities between the two major mobile OSs, since you never know which your target is using. And second, iOS is not, as your article states, the world's most popular smartphone and tablet operating system. It is second most popular to Android (activated iOS devices = 600 million compared with Android's 750 million). Understanding that, one can see why the bigger picture is not to fawn over iOS's bells and whistles but, rather, to embrace a mobile strategy that is OS independent.

  • by Randy Milanovic Tue Jul 9, 2013 via iphone

    I use the MarketingProfs app only because it facilitates commenting more easily than the web version.

  • by Raja Vikram Fri Jul 12, 2013 via web

    Very Good article. These 7 tips are really required for the marketers.

  • by Roberto Mon Jul 29, 2013 via web

    This article argues that iOS 7 will mean heavier Web content reading. I think that this will not happen till the iPhone moves to bigger screens.

    I have a Samsung (Note) and was at a friend's house at the week end. He would swear by the iPhone till he saw how easy it is to browse on a larger screen and now he is waiting for the realease of the Note 3.

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