Launching a new marketing campaign can be a tough sell even before you take your ideas to an external audience. Many marketers will tell you that one of the biggest challenges they face in their role is securing buy-in—and, crucially, budget—from their own board-level stakeholders.

Part of the challenge is that marketing is nearly always a speculative endeavor, making return on investment hard to predict. That's why it's sometimes viewed with considerable cynicism by those from financially minded disciplines.

Particularly in the case of marketing departments at business-to-business (B2B) firms, Sales often has a much heavier influence on decision-making than Marketing, our research has found.

So how can marketers exert more influence and ensure their ideas are given due attention? The solution lies in the key skills that any good marketer will have at their disposal.

At its most basic, marketing is about understanding how to play to people's needs and satisfy them. By applying that mentality to an internal audience, marketing teams should have more success in persuading financially minded colleagues to buy into their campaigns.

Here are five tactics that marketers can use to unlock budgets and put their plans into practice.

1. Involve them early

Marketers tend to invest a lot of time coming up with ideas before presenting to decision-makers. By that point, they can be completely absorbed in a project that may have already been through several signoff stages, making it all the more frustrating if these ideas are then by financial restrictions.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Julia Cupman

Julia Cupman is vice-president at global business-to-business market research agency B2B International, which serves a wide range of sectors, from traditional heavy industry to financial and business services. Reach her via +1-914-761-1909 or email: newyork@b2binternational.com.

LinkedIn: Julia Cupman