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Average Value of a Facebook Brand Fan Increases 28%

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The average value of a brand fan on Facebook in key consumer categories increased to $174 in 2012, from $136 in 2010, according to a new report from Syncapse

The 28% increase was driven by Facebook fans’ tendency to be super consumers: On average fans spend 43% more than non-fans in respective categories, despite not having higher incomes.

The study, The Value of a Facebook Fan 2013, examined the Facebook fan performance of 20 top brands. It estimated the value of a fan by looking at spending, media value, acquisition cost, loyalty, and the propensity to recommend a brand to others.

Below, additional key findings.

Value of a Facebook Fan

  • Brands with lower retail prices or with frequent repeat purchase cycles have smaller fan values. For example Coca-Cola ($70) and Skittles ($76). 
  • Brands with higher retail prices, or higher category purchases, have higher fan values. For example Target ($618) and BMW ($1,613). 

 

Social Media Habits of Brand Fans

  • 66% of fans of the brands examined were also fans of 10+ other brands. 
  • 75% of fans are likely to share good brand experiences. 
  • 66% of fans are likely to share bad brand experiences. 

 

Average Spend of a Fan

  • Excluding BMW and the Mass Merchandise category, fans spend on average $116 more per year in their respective categories than non-fans. 
  • The clothing-fashion category had the biggest difference, with fans reporting that they spend approximately $257 more per year than non-fans. 

 

About the research: The study was based on a 25-minute online panel survey of over 2,000 people residing in the US. The survey was conducted in late January and early February 2013. Respondents self-identified as fans by indicating which brands they have 'liked' on Facebook.


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Ayaz Nanji is an independent digital strategist and the co-founder of Inbound ContentWorks, a marketing agency that specializes in content creation for businesses and brands. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. His past experience includes working for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji

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  • by Seshu Tue May 14, 2013 via web

    Interesting read. I wonder if in calculating value of a fan if $ spent is taken into account and if so how is that the spend of a Coke fan is higher than the value. I would be interested to see the survey to get an idea of different components that went into the study.

  • by Erik Tue May 14, 2013 via web

    Something important to note is that a study of major consumer brands does not translate well to small and medium businesses. Especially for small businesses there is real risk of wasting money on FB ads aimed at attracting 'fans' who end up having zero effective economic value. That happens because unless your ads are extremely targeted, you are much more likely to get 'likes' from people who 'like' thousands of pages each year without much discrimination than you are to get 'likes' from fans who actually 'like' your product/service. You can read more here: http://wahanegi.com/do-not-advertise-on-facebook-until-you-read-this/

  • by Jonathan Tue May 21, 2013 via web

    Interesting article, but doesn't tackle the whole question of cause and effect. Do I spend more because of the engagement I see (or indeed don't see) on Facebook, or do I spend more because I'm a higher spending customer anyway? Is liking the brand on Facebook an output of that rather than an input.

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