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Consumers decide to read promotional emails on their mobile devices primarily based on whether they recognize who the messages are coming from, according to a recent report from Campaigner.

Just over 42% of US consumers surveyed say familiarity with the sender's name is the main influence on deciding whether to open a promotional email on their mobile device. Other major factors include awareness of a special deal/price in the message (20.5% say it influences) and the email's subject line (20.3%).

Below, additional key findings from the report, which was based on data from a survey of 3,038 US consumers who receive promotional emails.

Mobile Email Irritants 

  • 40.2% of consumers surveyed say the thing that irritates them most about marketing emails on mobile devices is irrelevant content.
  • 21.7% say they are annoyed most by emails with too much text or text that is difficult to read, 15.5% by messages that are not mobile-optimized, and 14.1% by having to scroll across a page to read.

Where Consumers Read Messages

  • 56.3% of consumers surveyed say they primarily read promotional emails while relaxing.
  • 28% say they primarily read promotional messages while at work.

Purchase Behavior

  • 51% of consumers surveyed say they have purchased items from their mobile device.
  • 28.4% say they have made a purchase directly from their mobile device as a result of an email they received on that device.

About the research: The report was based on data from a survey of 3,038 US consumers who receive promotional emails.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Ayaz Nanji

Ayaz Nanji is a digital strategist and a co-founder of ICW Media, a marketing agency specializing in content and social media services for tech firms. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. He has worked for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji