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I'm sure this will come as a shock, but sometimes we marketers are guilty of overcomplicating things. Processes involve numerous teams, spreadsheets have dozens of tabs, and plans can take pages and pages to explain.

And all that is not necessarily bad: we are constantly testing, improving, and creating new things, and that's what makes our brands grow.

But sometimes it's nice to take a step back and remember that things don't have to be complicated, expecially when you're first implementing a strategy or reworking one that's gotten out of control.

Today's infographic by form experts Formstack reminds us that in a digital world, lead generation—the heart of many of our marketing programs—consists of just four steps:

  1. Launch marketing collateral. Email is the most used lead gen practice in the B2B world, followed by events and content marketing, according to the infographic.
  2. Capture lead info via a form. Be sure to track the lead source and automatically route the data into your CRM.
  3. Analyze. Which sources and which collateral provide the best leads? Which provide the worst?
  4. Iterate. Test, test, test.

To see the details on all four steps and get your lead-gen processes moving, check out the infographic. Tap or click to see a larger version.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Laura Forer

Laura Forer is a freelance writer, email and content strategist, and crossword puzzle enthusiast. She's an assistant editor at MarketingProfs, where she manages infographic submissions, among other things.