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Have you noticed that the best books and movies are so totally immersive you feel as if you've actually entered the world they depict? Which is why I'd argue that the people most skilled in content aren't necessarily the best writers; rather, they're the ones who are able to empathize with characters so well that their creations seem real.

When writing for marketing, you need to connect with your audience. But first you have to understand who they are and what they care about. That's where empathy mapping comes in.

What Is an Empathy Map?

An empathy map is a tool that brings to light to your most likely customers. It teaches you how to connect with the people who will consume your content, products, or services.

Typically divided into quadrants of say, think, do, and feel, the empathy map is intended to get into the head—and heart—of the customer. It helps you to visualize that what someone says doesn't always align with what they do. That's why it's also important to understand what they think and feel.

For example, someone might say they love the service you provide, yet still shun your products. Could it be that the cost is too high, and in their social circles that may not be something they're willing to say? Or maybe they feel passionately about your products but think the purchase isn't practical.

Unfortunately, those conflicting "boxes" in the empathy map are the norm: Human life is rife with examples of cognitive dissonance that make little sense if you think purchase decisions follow the 19th century buyer funnel of attention-interest-desire-action. They don't.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Linda Emma

Linda Emma is a digital marketing strategist and college educator. She is lead content manager at Cambridge, Mass.-based ESM Digital and an instructor and a tutor at Endicott College.

LinkedIn: Linda Emma