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Most pay-per-lead B2B marketers (51%) say knowing a buyer's purchasing time horizon is the most important data point they want but often don't get, according to a recent report by Business.com.

The size of the buyer's business, as measured by employee base, is the second most valuable additional data point for leads: 31% of marketers say it would be extremely valuable to know.

That's followed by industry type (29% say it would be extremely valuable) and job title (20%).

Below, additional key findings from the report, which was based on a survey of 500 of Business.com's pay-per-lead advertisers focused on the SMB market.

Content Marketing

The survey found significant interest in leads generated through content marketing campaigns:

  • Most survey respondents are interested in leads generated from the publication of whitepapers (51% say these leads are valuable/extremely valuable).
  • 34% say leads from hosted webinars that feature their company or products are valuable/extremely valuable.

  • Respondents also expressed interest in leads generated from sponsored email (38% say they are valuable/extremely valuable), video (35%), and case studies (38%).

Hot Transfers and Lead Scoring

  • 42% of survey respondents expressed strong interest in "hot transfers"—the practice of connecting companies immediately with leads as they come in.
  • 60% of respondents are very interested in lead scoring, whereby individual leads are assigned a score reflecting the likelihood a response.

About the research: The report was based on data from a survey conducted in May 2013 of 500 of Business.com's active pay-per-lead advertisers focused on the SMB market.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Ayaz Nanji

Ayaz Nanji is a digital strategist and a co-founder of ICW Media, a marketing agency specializing in content and social media services for tech firms. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. He has worked for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji