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Most people say they feel frustrated when they encounter AI-powered communication options from brands and are not able to talk to a human, according to recent research from Invoca and The Harris Poll.

The report was based on data from a survey conducted in May 2019 among 2,048 US adults age 18 and older.

Some 52% of respondents say they feel frustrated when a company has only automated communications, such as artificial intelligence-powered chatbots, with no option for human interaction.

Some 18% say they feel angry. But 16% say they like the experience.

 

Consumers' openness to brands using AI varies widely by vertical, the researchers found.

For example, some 49% of respondents say they would trust AI-generated retail advice but only 19% say they would trust AI-generated advice for financial services.

Younger consumers are more open to AI-experiences compared with older consumers: Some 22% of 18-to-34 year olds say they would trust AI-generated advice for healthcare and finance compared with 10% of respondents age 65 and older.

About the research: The report was based on data from a survey conducted in May 2019 among 2,048 US adults age 18 and older.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Ayaz Nanji

Ayaz Nanji is a digital strategist and a co-founder of ICW Media, a marketing agency specializing in content and social media services for tech firms. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. He has worked for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji