NEW! Marketing Strategy Master Class launches December 1. Learn more

I just returned from a week-long road trip to Illinois and Michigan. Lines at the airports were better than expected, service on the airlines worse, and shopping experiences a mixture of both....


How can one walk into a cafe and be ignored for 10 minutes while the cashier stares blankly into space and then writes notes on a pad, while next door I am treated as if I am the store's only customer and the most important person ever to enter the establishment?
All I wanted was to pay my buck and a half for cup of coffee from the self-serve bar at the cafe, and you would think that I was robbing the place. Next door, I didn't want anything but ended up spending more than $20.
At the first, I really wanted -- nay needed -- the coffee. At the second, the last thing I needed was several layers of chocolate candy. Yet, I never purchased my cup of Joe, instead went across street to the Chamber for a free cup, and savored the chocolate I bought.
The point here is that if we don't meet our customers' needs and wants (i.e., I wanted a good experience, so I didn't fill my need at the cafe), we slowly kill the brand and sales. Neither a good thing.

Sign up for free to read the full article.

Oh, boy. The dreaded sign up form.

Before you run for the hills, we wanted to let you know that MarketingProfs has thousands of marketing resources, including this one (yes, the one behind this sign up form), entirely free!

Simply subscribe to our newsletter and get instant access to how-to articles, guides, webinars and more for nada, nothing, zip, zilch, on the house...delivered right to your inbox! MarketingProfs is the largest marketing community in the world, and we are here to help you be a better marketer.

Already a member? Sign in now.

Loading...

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lewis Green, Founder and Managing Principal of L&G Business Solutions, LLC, (https://www.l-gsolutions.com) brings three decades of business management experience. L&G Business Solutions, LLC, represents his third company. Additionally, he held management positions with GTE Discovery Publications, Puget Sound Energy and Starbucks Coffee Company.

In addition to his business experiences, Lewis is a published author and a former journalist, sports writer and travel writer. His feature articles have appeared in books, magazines and newspapers throughout North America. He has taught in public schools; lobbied for organizations both in state capitols and in Washington, D.C.; delivered workshops, seminars, and training programs; and made presentations to audiences in colleges, businesses and professional organizations. Lewis also has served as a book editor with a large publisher, the Executive Editor overseeing four magazines, and a newspaper department editor. Lewis served eight years in the U.S. Air Force, where he received the Air Force Commendation Medal.