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English, of course. But maybe not for long....


From a CNET article titled U.N. delegates: English isn't good enough: "Divina Frau-Meigs, who teaches at the University of Paris III (Université de la Sorbonne Nouvelle), called for 'setting up a culture whereby you can use your own language, and that will be considered part of your human rights.'"
Until now, domains have been required to use English-language-only characters, meaning that alphabets in Cyrillic, Arabic, Kanji, or Chinese sinographs could not be used. But in recent weeks, delegates to a United Nations summit complained that "the ASCII-only choice was too English-centric and failed to respect other languages."
"This new society leaves people isolated, marginalized," said Adama Samassékou, a former Mali government official who is the president of the African Academy of Languages. "I think the digital divide is not as important as the linguistic divide. And that's the one we should be bridging in order to guarantee the democratic governance of the Internet."
So what's up? Is this a good or a bad thing? Is it political correctness or the right thing to consider? What will be the result if Domains abandon a one-language-for-all technolgy to become inclusive?

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Lewis Green, Founder and Managing Principal of L&G Business Solutions, LLC, (http://www.l-gsolutions.com) brings three decades of business management experience. L&G Business Solutions, LLC, represents his third company. Additionally, he held management positions with GTE Discovery Publications, Puget Sound Energy and Starbucks Coffee Company.

In addition to his business experiences, Lewis is a published author and a former journalist, sports writer and travel writer. His feature articles have appeared in books, magazines and newspapers throughout North America. He has taught in public schools; lobbied for organizations both in state capitols and in Washington, D.C.; delivered workshops, seminars, and training programs; and made presentations to audiences in colleges, businesses and professional organizations. Lewis also has served as a book editor with a large publisher, the Executive Editor overseeing four magazines, and a newspaper department editor. Lewis served eight years in the U.S. Air Force, where he received the Air Force Commendation Medal.