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Millennial parents tend to think of technology as a parenting tool and are more concerned about safe content than content overload for their kids, according to recent research from Fullscreen.

The report was based on data from a survey of 1,500 people in the United States. The researchers focused on examining the behaviors of Millennial parents (whom they dubbed "parennials"), the more than 36 million Americans age 25-37 in the US with at least one child at home.

Some 96% of parennials say they use technology to help them parent, with 47% saying they do so to give themselves a break.

 

Parennials are significantly more likely to own and regularly use newer technologies, compared with Millennials without children:

Parennials' top concern with online content is that their kids will encounter inappropriate themes (62% cite that as a worry).

Only one-third of respondents are concerned that too much online content will lead their kids to develop a technology addiction.

About the research: The report was based on data from a survey of 1,500 people in the United States.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
image of Ayaz Nanji

Ayaz Nanji is a digital strategist and a co-founder of ICW Media, a marketing agency specializing in content and social media services for tech firms. He is also a research writer for MarketingProfs. He has worked for Google/YouTube, the Travel Channel, AOL, and the New York Times.

LinkedIn: Ayaz Nanji

Twitter: @ayaznanji